Midlothian, VA. 804.378.2527

Lifelong Learning Chesterfield

History, Humanities and International Studies - Fall 2018              


Lifelong Learning Institute 
in Chesterfield                         

                                                                                    Not an LLI member? Join here now. It's easy!   

Daily Life in Ancient Rome                                         

Wednesday                                      HS183181           

9:30-11:30                          

Sept 5, 12, 19, 26, Oct 3, 10

Instructor(s): Glenn Markus

Republican and Imperial Rome had an immeasurable impact on the shape of the Western World, but there is more to understanding Rome than its great armies and conquests or its architectural and engineering achievements. Rome was populated with very ordinary people - citizen, artisans, and slaves who dealt with more mundane and every day concerns. This course is about ordinary Romans, how they lived, where they worked, how they amused themselves, and what they ate and drank. An extensive syllabus will be provided.

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Adventures of Hiking the Camino de Santiago in Europe                                             

Thursday                                            HS183381           

9:30-11:00                          

Sept 6

Instructor(s): Robert Abbott

The Camino is a series of paths and trails in Europe that all converge in the city of Santiago in northwest Spain, the resting spot for the bones of St. James. Since the 11th century, pilgrims have hiked the Camino to cleanse their souls. In more recent times the hike has changed from purely religious reasons to more spiritual and social reasons. This course is tailored to those who are possibly interested in hiking the Camino as well as those interested in learning more about the history and background of the Camino. There will be time for Q and A at the end, so students should come prepared with questions.

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Ten Crazy Tuesdays: Unforgettable U.S. Elections                                           

Monday                                              HS183375           

11:15-12:45                        

Sept 10, 17, 24, Oct 1, 15, 29, Nov 5, 19, 26, Dec 3

Instructor(s): Edward Blackwell

This course deals with concepts such as original intent, "the flexible document," republicanism, democracy, the two-party system, regionalism, third parties, federalism, rule of law, the electoral college, legislative power, and the role of the media in elections. What is legal? What is right? Are the two always reconciled to your satisfaction? The playing field will include the controversial elections of 1800, 1824, 1860, 1876, 1888, 1912, 1968, 1992, 2000, and 2016. Students will learn about "election deciders" like Alexander Hamilton, William Crawford, John Breckinridge, Ross Perot, and Ralph Nader. The foreign policy, economic development, and social climate of this nation has and will be shaped by…those crazy November Tuesdays! Suggested reading: “The Indispensable Electoral College” by Tara Ross.

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The Great American Experiment and the Civil War                                         

Tuesday                                              HS183377           

11:30-12:30                        

Sept 11

Instructor(s): Waite Rawls

The result of the American Revolution and the adoption of our Constitution created a new form of government. The rest of the world scoffed at it, and Americans knew it was an experiment that had never been tested or proven. The Civil War was its big test. This course will discuss this topic from the view of the rest of the world and see how the Civil War saved the great American experiment in government.

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Anthropology Discussion A:  Are We Rome?                                      

Wednesday                                      HS183337           

12:00-1:00                          

Sept 12, Oct 10, Nov 14, Dec 12

Instructor(s): Annebel Lewis

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. This is a DISCUSSION group (not a lecture course). Anthropology provides a lens through which we can continue to understand the world. History doesn't repeat itself, but human behavior does. `Anthropology provides a firm foundation to stand on as we look critically at our own society and at global society. It's not only what we've learned about the past and other cultures, but how we can apply what we've learned to better understand the present. The most dangerous assumption is to presume that you already understand. THINK! Step outside your box. Suggested readings are "Are We Rome" by Cullen Murphy and "The Aeneid" by Virgil.

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Currencies of the U.S.: A Funny Thing Happened to Our Money on the Way to the Bank                                              

Thursday                                            HS183376           

9:00-10:30                          

Sept 13, 20

Instructor(s): Bill Kump

This course will explore currencies from the beginning of the United States to those currently being used today. Students will have a chance to see and learn about unusual things that have happened to our money along the way.

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The Fall of Richmond on April 2, 1865                                    

Friday                                  HS183382           

10:30-11:30                        

Sept 14

Instructor(s): Hank Holland

The fall of Richmond, the night of April 2, 1865, is known as the night they drove old Dixie down. The Confederate Government, Army and the citizens left behind in Richmond on that fateful night will be the topic of this course. Students will enjoy a lecture, brochures and a video presentation.

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Great Decisions                                               

Tuesday                                              HS183089            *$20

1:30-3:00                             

Sept 18, Oct 16, Nov 20, Dec 18

Instructor(s): Bob Ferguson

The Foreign Policy Association board prepares a book, “Great Decisions,” covering eight topics each year which inspires students to learn more and to discuss topics of interest in the area of foreign affairs. This course will continue using the 2018 edition along with a DVD for most of the monthly meetings. In addition, four other topics will be covered to create a year-long curriculum. Topics for this session are: September: Turkey – A Partner in Crisis; October: Media and Foreign Policy; November: U.S. Global Engagement and the Military; December: Year-end Review and Update (not in book). Purchase of the book through LLI is optional, and payment is due at registration.

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Current Events Discussion A                                      

Wednesday                                      HS183003           

12:30-2:00                          

Sept 19, Oct 10, 31, Nov 14, Dec 5

Instructor(s): Fred Nelson

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. This class will begin with a short introduction by the moderator, who will suggest current event topics of international, national, state, and local importance.  Students will determine the choice of topics for a round-table discussion in which everyone's viewpoint is important and during which differing opinions are always respected.

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Current Events Discussion B                                      

Wednesday                                      HS183004           

2:15-3:45                             

Sept 19, Oct 10, 31, Nov 14, Dec 5

Instructor(s): Fred Nelson

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. This class will begin with a short introduction by the moderator, who will suggest current event topics of international, national, state, and local importance.  Students will determine the choice of topics for a round-table discussion in which everyone's viewpoint is important and during which differing opinions are always respected.

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Ending Human Trafficking in the 21st Century                                   

Tuesday                                              HS183386           

11:30-1:00                          

Sept 25

Instructor(s): Linda Hawkins, RN, BSN

This course will define the multi-faceted issue of human trafficking. Students will learn what is being done in the community to combat this social injustice by providing warning signs, lures and tips on how to report suspected cases of human trafficking. Come learn about the various ways to join the fight to end human trafficking in the 21st Century!

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World War II Military Records Workshop                                            

Wednesday                                      HS183380           

10:30-12:00                        

Sept 26

Instructor(s): Kyndall Drumheller and James Triesler

This course is for those who would like to learn more about their family member's military service in World War II but don't know where to begin. Students will learn to navigate through their research using internet sources and primary documents.

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Anthropology Discussion B:  Are We Rome?                                      

Wednesday                                      HS183338           

1:30-2:30                             

Sept 26, Oct 24, Nov 28, Dec 19

Instructor(s): Annebel Lewis

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. This is a DISCUSSION group (not a lecture course). Anthropology provides a lens through which we can continue to understand the world. History doesn't repeat itself, but human behavior does. `Anthropology provides a firm foundation to stand on as we look critically at our own society and at global society. It's not only what we've learned about the past and other cultures, but how we can apply what we've learned to better understand the present. The most dangerous assumption is to presume that you already understand. THINK! Step outside your box. Suggested readings are "Are We Rome" by Cullen Murphy and "The Aeneid" by Virgil.

                                ______________________________


Franklin D. Roosevelt A: President of Hope                                       

Tuesday                                              HS183370           

9:00-10:30                          

Oct 2, 9, 23, 30, Nov 13, 27, Dec 11, 18

Instructor(s): Shep Smith

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. When Franklin Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, the nation had staggered to a halt. One third of the nation was unemployed, factories were idle, industrial production had been cut in half, and banks were closing. The Great Depression was at its worst, and the American people were depressed and hopeless. Into this gloomy environment stepped FDR who could not stand or walk, but as one historian wrote: "He lifted himself from his wheel chair to lift this nation from its knees." With his broad smile, optimism and pragmatic leadership he assured the nation that it had “nothing to fear but fear itself” and led the nation through the worst financial crisis in its history and the largest war in world history. In leading the nation through these crises, FDR was elected to an unprecedented four terms as president and is considered to be one of the greatest presidents in American history.

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Franklin D. Roosevelt B: President of Hope                                        

Tuesday                                              HS183371           

11:30-1:00                          

Oct 2, 9, 23, 30, Nov 13, 27, Dec 11, 18

Instructor(s): Shep Smith

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. When Franklin Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, the nation had staggered to a halt. One third of the nation was unemployed, factories were idle, industrial production had been cut in half, and banks were closing. The Great Depression was at its worst, and the American people were depressed and hopeless. Into this gloomy environment stepped FDR who could not stand or walk, but as one historian wrote: "He lifted himself from his wheel chair to lift this nation from its knees." With his broad smile, optimism and pragmatic leadership he assured the nation that it had “nothing to fear but fear itself” and led the nation through the worst financial crisis in its history and the largest war in world history. In leading the nation through these crises, FDR was elected to an unprecedented four terms as president and is considered to be one of the greatest presidents in American history.

                                ______________________________


Voices of World War II                                 

Wednesday                                      HS183327           

2:00-3:30                             

Oct 3, 17, 24

Instructor(s): James Triesler

This course will explore WWII using the letters of those who lived through it. Original letters and photographs will be on display. Join your fellow LLI members for this moving look at one of the most trying times in American history.

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Global Cultural Geography: The Middle East Past and Present                                  

Thursday                                            HS183087           

9:00-11:00                          

Oct 4, 11

Instructor(s): William Seay

Cultural geography is one of the two major branches of geography (versus physical geography) and is often called human geography. Cultural geography is the study of the many cultural aspects found throughout the world and how they relate to the spaces and places where they originate and then travel as people continually move across various areas.

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Agecroft Hall's Excellent Adventure                                      

Friday                                  HS183385           

10:00-11:30                        

Oct 5

Instructor(s): Libby Howlett

LLI has arranged two visits for members to tour Agecroft Hall. Whether you were able to attend those tours or not, now is a chance for students to learn more about how the house ended up in Richmond, VA. This course will explore the owners, the building materials and the means of getting the house to America, as well as more history about the house than can be covered in their guided tours.

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American Civil War Times in Chesterfield County, Virginia                                         

Friday                                  HS183364           

10:00-11:00                        

Oct 12

Instructor(s): Hank Holland

This course will present students with a slide presentation of Civil War sites and stories that occurred throughout Chesterfield County between 1861 and 1865.

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The Big Picture A: A View into the Cold War                                      

Friday                                  HS183372           

9:30-11:00                          

Oct 19

Instructor(s): Dr. John Lemza

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. As television rapidly grew to become part of American popular culture from the 1950s through the early 1970s so did Americans’ exposure to exciting compilation documentaries such as “Crusade in Europe” and “Victory at Sea.” This period of time also witnessed the growth of primetime and syndicated informational television shows that modeled themselves after those documentaries and provided a view into world events during the Cold War. The Big Picture was one of those critically acclaimed shows that appeared on TV each week and offered its viewing audience a unique, and often somber, look into the ongoing tensions between the East and West. This course presents the results of research that explain the impact shows, such as the “Big Picture,” had on shaping and informing American public opinion during the dangerous years of the Cold War.

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Hanover County during the Civil War                                    

Thursday                                            HS183348           

10:00-11:00                        

Nov 1

Instructor(s): Kendrick Gibbs

This course will explore the Civil War as it was seen and experienced by men, women, soldiers, and slaves. From battles to technological advancements, students will get a microscopic look at how the Civil War affected one particular county, Hanover County.

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The Big Picture B: A View into the Cold War                                      

Friday                                  HS183373           

9:30-11:00                          

Nov 2

Instructor(s): Dr. John Lemza

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. As television rapidly grew to become part of American popular culture from the 1950s through the early 1970s so did Americans’ exposure to exciting compilation documentaries such as “Crusade in Europe” and “Victory at Sea.” This period of time also witnessed the growth of primetime and syndicated informational television shows that modeled themselves after those documentaries and provided a view into world events during the Cold War. The Big Picture was one of those critically acclaimed shows that appeared on TV each week and offered its viewing audience a unique, and often somber, look into the ongoing tensions between the East and West. This course presents the results of research that explain the impact shows, such as the “Big Picture,” had on shaping and informing American public opinion during the dangerous years of the Cold War.

                                ______________________________


The Impact of Versailles                                              

Wednesday                                      HS183378           

2:00-3:30                             

Nov 7

Instructor(s): James Triesler

This course will take a look at the conclusion of World War I, the Treaty of Versailles, and the impact that events from 100 years ago had on shaping the rest of the 20th Century. WWI Artifacts will be displayed.

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Scotland: Land of Kilts, Haggis and Dancing                                        

Thursday                                            HS183374           

9:30-11:00                          

Nov 15

Instructor(s): Dr. Robin Poulton

As a prolific author on international, peace and African issues, Dr. Poulton has now written a book on Scotland and on Dancing: “I Dance, Therefore I Am”, which challenges René Descartes’ idea “I think, therefore I am.” Dr. Poulton champions the philosophy of the Scottish Enlightenment: it is PASSION and not reason that determines human action. He urges his grandchildren to dance, to laugh and love people, and to promote a philosophy of life that delivers “the greatest happiness of the greatest number.” His new book is filled with wit and humor, interspersing dances with personal stories, family stories and jokes. This course will follow this humorous model, as well as show dancing and beautiful pictures of Scotland, of kilts and of haggis.

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Chesterfield County Bottles and Companies                                     

Friday                                  HS183383           

10:00-11:30                        

Nov 16

Instructor(s): Anthony and Phillip Townsend

Chesterfield County has many antique bottles from a rich history of businesses that existed in the 19th and 20th centuries. The instructors, advanced collectors and researchers of antique bottles and pottery from the County, will share the history of these companies. Discussion will begin with colonial era bottling history of the early 17th century and will focus on bottling during the industrial revolution through the mid-twentieth century. Examples of many rare, antique bottles from Chesterfield County's early druggist, mineral water, soda, liquor, and milk companies that existed from the 1880s-1940s will also be displayed. This includes items from the communities of Ettrick, South Richmond, Manchester, and Chesterfield Court House. The history of Chesterfield County's Lithia Springs as well as bottles from Midlothian's coal mining and general stores will also be discussed. Students can bring along any items related to the topic for free identification and appraisals after class.

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Letters from a Soviet Prison and a Son's Search for the Truth                                     

Monday                                              HS183334            *$25

11:30-12:30                        

Dec 10

Instructor(s): Francis Gary Powers, Jr.

In 2015, Steven Spielberg directed the Academy Award-winning film, “Bridge of Spies,” about the exchange of CIA U-2 pilot, Francis Gary Powers, for KGB Colonel Rudolph Abel. This course will separate fact from fiction and provide an in-depth overview of the Cold War, U-2 Incident, and a son’s search for the truth through the pilot’s personal journal and correspondence from Soviet prison. On May 1, 1960, Francis Gary Powers, Sr., was shot down by a surface-to-air missile while flying over the Soviet Union. Powers bailed out and parachuted safely to the ground where he was captured by the KGB and held for interrogation. America’s secret reconnaissance missions were exposed and President Eisenhower was forced to admit to aerial spying. After extensive questioning by the KGB, Powers was convicted of spying and sentenced to ten years in prison. In February 1962, he and a detained American student were traded for captured Soviet spy Rudolf Abel. If you would like a copy of the new book, “Letters from a Soviet Prison: The Personal Journal and Correspondence of CIA U-2 Pilot Francis Gary Powers,” simply pay the optional course fee at time of registration, and you will receive your signed copy at the class!

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Prohibition in the South with a Focus on Virginia                                            

Wednesday                                      HS183384           

10:30-12:00                        

Dec 12

Instructor(s): Anthony Townsend

October 31st, 1916, which was Halloween, was the last day for the brewing and consumption of alcohol in the Commonwealth, and federal law would mandate this two years later. This course will discuss the events leading up to Prohibition in the south, specifically in Virginia to include breweries and distillers that were in operation across the state of Virginia, including Home Brewing, Roseneck, Phil Kelly and others. Students will learn about the operation of soft drink bottling during prohibition by breweries to remain in business during this time and the aftermath of Prohibition in Virginia. There will be a display of rare items from bottlers of this time period from Virginia.

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Baseball and the Great War                                       

Wednesday                                      HS183379           

2:00-3:30                             

Dec 12

Instructor(s): James Triesler

This course will take a look at the impact that World War I had on the game of baseball, our National pastime. World War I and Baseball Artifacts will be displayed.

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About Fees
Your Lifelong Learning Institute membership gives you access to all of LLI classes and trips, most without any additional costs. There are some classes and trips which require additional fees. Where there are additional fees, those fees must be paid at the time of registration. Fees can be paid by check, cash or credit card. If paying by check, please clearly indicate the classes and trips being covered.