Midlothian, VA. 804.378.2527

Lifelong Learning Chesterfield

History, Humanities and International Studies - Spring 2019              


Lifelong Learning Institute 
in Chesterfield                         

                                                                                    Not an LLI member? Join here now. It's easy!   

Anthropology Discussion A:  A Fractured Continent                                       

Wednesday                                      HS191337           

12:00-1:00                          

Jan 9, Feb 13, March 13, April 10

Instructor(s): Annebel Lewis

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. This is a DISCUSSION Group.  Anthropology studies not only what we’ve learned about the past and other cultures, but how we can apply what we’ve learned in order to better understand the present.  Disregard the conventional map of North America.  The lines on the map slash through cohesive cultures, cultural forces that have driven the affairs of our sprawling continent.  Each of our founding cultures had its own set of cherished principles, and they often contradicted one another.  These distinct cultures developed in remarkable isolation from one another, consolidating unique values, practices, dialects, and ideals.  These cultures are still with us today and have spread their people, ideas, and influences across mutually exclusive bands of the continent.  Suggested reading is “American Nations” by Colin Woodward and “Earning the Rockies” by Robert D. Kaplan.

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Current Events Discussion A                                      

Wednesday                                      HS191003           

12:30-2:00                          

Jan 9, 30, Feb 20, March 13, April 10, May 1

Instructor(s): Fred Nelson

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. This class will begin with a short introduction by the moderator, who will suggest current event topics of international, national, state, and local importance.  Students will determine the choice of topics for a round-table discussion in which everyone's viewpoint is important and during which differing opinions are always respected.

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Current Events Discussion B                                      

Wednesday                                      HS191004           

2:15-3:45                             

Jan 9, 30, Feb 20, March 13, April 10, May 1

Instructor(s): Fred Nelson

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. This class will begin with a short introduction by the moderator, who will suggest current event topics of international, national, state, and local importance.  Students will determine the choice of topics for a round-table discussion in which everyone's viewpoint is important and during which differing opinions are always respected.

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The Greater African Development Agenda                                         

Friday                                  HS191326           

11:30-1:00                          

Jan 11, 25, Feb 1, 8, 15, 22, March 1, 22, 29

Instructor(s): Emmanuel Chunda

Historically, the focus on Africa has focused on its challenges. This old view has been emphasized through various studies and more so the media. However, there is a narrative on Africa that is yet to be popularized; that Africa has been developing at a very fast pace. There are major development projects in all parts of the continent and the standard of living of people has generally improved. In this course, we will focus on understanding the major developments taking place in Africa and how some challenges that have dominated the international media are being resolved. If you want to have a unique perspective on Africa and learn about the Africa you do not know, this is the class for you.

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Great Decisions                                               

Tuesday                                              HS191089            *$35

1:30-3:00                             

Jan 15, Feb 19, March 19, April 23

Instructor(s): Bob Ferguson

The Great Decisions board prepares a book covering eight topics each year. This course will be using the new 2019 edition along with a DVD for most of the monthly meetings. In addition, four other topics will be covered to create a year-long curriculum. Since each topic is independent, members can miss a class if necessary. Topics are: January - nine issues that need to be addressed by the Trump administration (not in the book); February - The Middle East; March - Refugees and Global Migration; April - Nuclear Negotiations. Come join us for information and discussion on a range of topics. The book is available for purchase through LLI during Open Registration only, but it is not required for the course.

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The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic                                             

Wednesday                                      HS191078           

9:30-11:30                          

Jan 16, 23, 30, Feb 6, 13, 20

Instructor(s): Glenn Markus

In the last half of the first millennium B.C., a group of tough peasant farmers under the leadership of the Roman Senate and its aristocratic oligarchy first conquered the Italian peninsula and then extended Rome's dominion over the entire Mediterranean world. Eventually the peasant armies evolved into professional military forces that were drawn into competition for power among such powerful warlords as Marius, Sulla, Pompey the Great, and Julius Caesar. Ultimately, the Republic collapsed into persistent anarchy and civil war. This course examines the origins, rise to power, and eventual disintegration of the Republic and the emergence in its place of an even more powerful Imperial Rome. An extensive syllabus will be provided.

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Anthropology Discussion B:  A Fractured Continent                                        

Wednesday                                      HS191338           

1:30-2:30                             

Jan 23, Feb 27, March 27, April 24

Instructor(s): Annebel Lewis

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. This is a DISCUSSION Group.  Anthropology studies not only what we’ve learned about the past and other cultures, but how we can apply what we’ve learned in order to better understand the present.  Disregard the conventional map of North America.  The lines on the map slash through cohesive cultures, cultural forces that have driven the affairs of our sprawling continent.  Each of our founding cultures had its own set of cherished principles, and they often contradicted one another.  These distinct cultures developed in remarkable isolation from one another, consolidating unique values, practices, dialects, and ideals.  These cultures are still with us today and have spread their people, ideas, and influences across mutually exclusive bands of the continent.  Suggested reading is “American Nations” by Colin Woodward and “Earning the Rockies” by Robert D. Kaplan.

                                ______________________________


Great Dictators: Cromwell and Napoleon                                            

Thursday                                            HS191390           

9:30-11:00                          

Jan 24, 31

Instructor(s): Martin Fisher

This course will look at the evolution of two great dictators, Cromwell and Napoleon. It will also aim to answer the question, “What makes a dictator?” Oliver Cromwell executed King Charles I, established a Parliament with teeth and made sure the Church of England stayed the religion. Napoleon’s battle record of 31-3 is three times better than anyone else, but his Russian invasion had the same result as Hitler 135 years later.

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Holocaust Shadows: Growing up as the Child of Two Survivors                                 

Monday                                              HS191402           

11:15-12:45                        

Jan 28

Instructor(s): Sandy Schimmel Gold

If you ever wanted to hear the personal stories of Holocaust survivors, this is the course for you. The instructor will share her parents’ history surviving the Nazi occupation of Hungary, concentration camp, liberation, displaced persons camp, and immigration to the United States. These are the stories her parents shared--not political and not historical. RECOMMENDED READING: “To See You Again: A True Story of Love in a Time of War” by Betty Schimmel.

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Spy Pilot: Francis Gary Powers, the U-2 Incident, and a Controversial Cold War Legacy                                 

Wednesday                                      HS191401            *$25

10:30-12:00                        

Jan 30

Instructor(s): Francis Gary Powers, Jr.

For over 25 years, Midlothian resident, Francis Gary Powers Jr., has conducted research on the Cold War and the misinformation about the U-2 Incident of May 1, 1960. In his new book, Spy Pilot, Gary separates fact from fiction and helps to set the record straight in regards to the conspiracy theories that surrounded his father and the U-2 Incident. Using recently declassified files, never before published written histories, and unpublished audio recordings by key individuals associated with the U-2 program, Gary uncovers the truth behind the U-2 Incident. During this course, Gary will talk about the Cold War; the Spielberg movie, “Bridge of Spies”; his book, “Letters from a Soviet Prison”; and the research that went into his most recent book. If you would like a copy of the new book, “Spy Pilot,” simply pay the optional course fee at time of registration, and you will receive your signed copy at the class!

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American Civil War Times in Chesterfield County, Virginia                                         

Friday                                  HS191364           

10:00-11:00                        

Feb 1

Instructor(s): Hank Holland

This course will present students with a slide presentation of Civil War sites and stories that occurred throughout Chesterfield County between 1861 and 1865.

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The British Royal Family: 1936 to Present                                            

Thursday                                            HS191317           

9:30-11:00                          

Feb 7, 14, 21

Instructor(s): Martin Fisher

This course will continue looking into the British Royal Family starting with the abdication of King Edward VIII in 1936 and ending with Meghan and Harry’s marriage. Insights into British culture, speech, way of life, heraldry and education will be covered topics.

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Adventures of Hiking the Camino de Santiago in Europe                                             

Thursday                                            HS191381           

1:00-3:00                             

Feb 7

Instructor(s): Robert Abbott

The Camino is a series of paths and trails in Europe that all converge in the city of Santiago in northwest Spain, the resting spot for the bones of St. James. Since the 11th century, pilgrims have hiked the Camino to cleanse their souls. In more recent times the hike has changed from purely religious reasons to more spiritual and social reasons. This course is tailored to those who are possibly interested in hiking the Camino as well as those interested in learning more about the history and background of the Camino. There will be time for questions at the end!

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World War Two and the Home Front A                                

Friday                                  HS191391           

9:30-11:00                          

Feb 8, 15, 22

Instructor(s): Dr. John Lemza

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. Victory gardens, rationing, bond sales, Rosie the Riveter, and the Arsenal of Democracy. This course unpacks those events that affected American lives along the home front against the backdrop of World War Two. It uses a grassroots approach to interpret how the war informed the thinking of non-combatants and how it shaped and changed their lives by following important cultural, societal, political and economic themes at the national and regional levels.

                                ______________________________


Global Cultural Geography: The Middle East Past and Present                                  

Tuesday                                              HS191087           

9:00-11:00                          

Feb 12, 19

Instructor(s): William Seay

Cultural geography is one of the two major branches of geography (versus physical geography) and is often called human geography. Cultural geography is the study of the many cultural aspects found throughout the world and how they relate to the spaces and places where they originate and then travel as people continually move across various areas.

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Early Bon Air History: Prominent Founders and Families                                             

Wednesday                                      HS191238           

10:30-12:00                        

Feb 13

Instructor(s): Lenard W. Tuck, Jr.

This course will provide an introductory history of the affluent Chesterfield county community first developed as a post-war resort that attracted prominent cultural, military, business and social leaders of 19th century Richmond, becoming one of the most historically significant communities in the Richmond area.

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Monuments Men                                           

Monday                                              HS191292           

11:15-12:45                        

Feb 25, March 4

Instructor(s): Kenneth D. Alford

Van Eyck's "Ghent Altarpiece", Michaelango's "Statue of Madonna and Child", Vermeer's "The Artist in His Studio"; what happened to these celebrated artworks and other treasures procured by the Third Reich during the thirties and forties? Monuments Men - Nazi Europe answers that question while telling a remarkable story of greed and avarice, with war-torn Europe as its backdrop. More than fifty years of research and documentation have revealed the extent to which the German Forces stole from the land they occupied and portrays the American military as both liberators and plunderers themselves. Van Eyck's "Ghent Altarpiece" and Michaelango's "Statue of Madonna and Child" were featured in the movie "Monuments Men". The class will start by revealing fact verses fiction in this excellent movie.

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Pocahontas State Park: There's Something for Everyone                                             

Wednesday                                      HS191398           

1:00-3:00                             

Feb 27

Instructor(s): Rebecca Whalen

From shipwrecks to an 18th century fort, from kayaks to hiking sticks, and from birds to snakes--there's something for everyone at Virginia's State Parks! Join a Ranger to learn more about the history, wildlife, and recreational and volunteer opportunities of your local state park, Pocahontas. Students will also virtually travel to various other parks within the Commonwealth. Built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the 1930s, Pocahontas is now the largest state park with nearly 8,000 acres and offers activities for all ages.

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First Baptist Church of Midlothian: A Rich History                                           

Friday                                  HS191267           

11:30-12:30                        

March 1

Instructor(s): Audrey M. Ross

This course will present a brief history of the First Baptist Church of Midlothian (our neighbor's across the street), which is the oldest African American Church in Chesterfield County! Information on the history, contributions, and accomplishments of the African Americans in the Village of Midlothian will also be shared.

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Andrew Jackson A: Old Hickory                                

Tuesday                                              HS191387           

9:30-11:00                          

March 5, 12, 19, 26, April 9, 16

Instructor(s): Shep Smith

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. Andrew Jackson was the first president not born in Virginia or Massachusetts. He was the first president to be born into poverty and to become an orphan at a young age. He rose to fame and created a popular following by being an Indian fighter, conqueror of the hated British at the Battle of New Orleans, and of the hated privileged few in the U.S. Jackson was idolized by most Americans and vilified by other Americans as King Andrew. He was the symbol for the common man that showed that in America anyone could rise from the bottom to the top. Nationalists who believed that the federal government should be more powerful than the state governments found a hero in Jackson, and he has been used as an example by Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, and Franklin Roosevelt. Recently, the standing of Jackson among the presidents has declined because of his defense of slavery and the removal of Indians to the west. There is also a movement to remove his portrait from the twenty dollar bill. Examine the life and career of Andrew Jackson and make your own judgment about Old Hickory.

                                ______________________________


Andrew Jackson B: Old Hickory                                

Thursday                                            HS191388           

9:30-11:00                          

March 7, 14, 21, 28, April 11, 18

Instructor(s): Shep Smith

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. Andrew Jackson was the first president not born in Virginia or Massachusetts. He was the first president to be born into poverty and to become an orphan at a young age. He rose to fame and created a popular following by being an Indian fighter, conqueror of the hated British at the Battle of New Orleans, and of the hated privileged few in the U.S. Jackson was idolized by most Americans and vilified by other Americans as King Andrew. He was the symbol for the common man that showed that in America anyone could rise from the bottom to the top. Nationalists who believed that the federal government should be more powerful than the state governments found a hero in Jackson, and he has been used as an example by Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, and Franklin Roosevelt. Recently, the standing of Jackson among the presidents has declined because of his defense of slavery and the removal of Indians to the west. There is also a movement to remove his portrait from the twenty dollar bill. Examine the life and career of Andrew Jackson and make your own judgment about Old Hickory.

                                ______________________________


Jim Atwood: Army Officer, Charmer, Entrepreneur, Collector, Risk-Taker, Rogue, and Con-Artist                                            

Monday                                              HS191397            *$23

11:15-12:45                        

March 11

Instructor(s): Kenneth D. Alford

Honest businessman or con-artist? Loyal friend or “selective sociopath”? Jim Atwood was a colorful Savannah native who, like a Rembrandt chiaroscuro painting, was a study in light and dark, moving from bon vivant to Bad Boy effortlessly. In a fascinating narrative, the instructor will tell of a loveable rogue who barely avoided a military stockade yet still became a Lieutenant Colonel in a high-profile Army intelligence post. Atwood was a man who prospered working alongside rogue CIA agents, generals, criminals, and at least one agent from the “other side.” He could enthrall Senators or laborers and dazzle the ladies while at the same time being a man’s man. Everyone who thought they knew him rarely saw the complete Jim. It remained for a few confidants to assemble the scattered pieces of the puzzle this James Bond-like man left behind at his demise. The instructor has authored a book, “Jim Atwood,” which is optionally available for purchase through LLI during Open Registration only, and payment is due at registration.

                                ______________________________


Audubon's America: Wild Times                                             

Tuesday                                              HS191395           

9:00-10:30                          

March 12, 19, 26

Instructor(s): Patricia Ryther

A young man in a young nation, John James Audubon had the ambitious goal of painting all the birds of America, life-size. The still-new United States was mostly wilderness, and Audubon had a small business to run and a family to support. His beloved wife, Lucy, didn’t always support his efforts, and he labored without success for years. He had little formal training in art or science, and he suffered personal rejection and financial ruin. But Audubon never gave up, and when he finally took his portfolio of paintings to Europe, his dream came true. He not only painted the birds but studied their habits, their biology, and added to the scientific understanding of how birds migrate, care for their young, and live in the natural world. This course will follow Audubon and get familiar with his world, a time of explosive growth and rapid technological change. Students will examine some of the obstacles to his success, from physical danger to personal insult, and the legacy he left for the conservationists who would follow.

                                ______________________________


Court Decisions: You Try It!                                        

Thursday                                            HS191389           

11:30-1:00                          

March 14, 21, 28, April 11, 18

Instructor(s): Edward Blackwell

This will be a highly interactive course where students will use the Constitution and their common sense to reach "court decisions" in cases involving relevant and widely varied topics including citizenship, liability, reasonable suspicion, probable cause, treason, due process, and interstate commerce, just to name a few. Student decisions will be discussed and compared to verdicts in real-life cases. Come learn about the Constitution; jurisdiction; torts; civil rights; enumerated, implied, and denied powers and more!

                                ______________________________


World War Two and the Home Front B                                 

Friday                                  HS191392           

9:30-11:00                          

March 15, 22, 29

Instructor(s): Dr. John Lemza

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. Victory gardens, rationing, bond sales, Rosie the Riveter, and the Arsenal of Democracy. This course unpacks those events that affected American lives along the home front against the backdrop of World War Two. It uses a grassroots approach to interpret how the war informed the thinking of non-combatants and how it shaped and changed their lives by following important cultural, societal, political and economic themes at the national and regional levels.

                                ______________________________


Nazi Treasures                                 

Monday                                              HS191286           

11:15-12:45                        

March 18, 25

Instructor(s): Kenneth D. Alford

This course will cover the history of Hermann Goering's art and war trophies, the theft and final settlement of the Hungarian Gold Train, and allied looting by American Soldiers.

                                ______________________________


Tomb of Tutankhamun: Life and Death of the Boy King                                 

Wednesday                                      HS191367           

1:30-3:00                             

March 20

Instructor(s): Maha Shawky Whitfield

The discovery of the tomb of Tutankhamun in November 1922 was the discovery of the century and still is! It is more important now since Egyptologists believe that there are more rooms to be discovered, maybe even the hidden burial place for Queen Nefertiti! King Tut was one of the great rulers of Egypt. He became king at the age of eight at a time when Egypt was going through political and religious instability. Thanks to new medical advancements, we learned more about the king, his family and his treasures. We will try to understand how religious and political life was in Egypt in 1330 BC.

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Bottling Milk in America                                             

Friday                                  HS191400           

1:00-3:00                             

March 22

Instructor(s): Anthony and Phillip Townsend

This course will cover the invention of the glass milk bottle in 1885 and will include the end of the glass milk bottle era in the 60s at the beginning of paper cartons. The milk bottle history of Virginia will also be shared. A display of early milk bottles and Virginia milk bottles will be shown. Also, on display will be the first glass milk bottle ever invented. Students may bring any milk bottle items relating to this topic for free identification and appraisals at the end of class.

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Researching World War II Online                                            

Monday                                              HS191396           

11:15-12:45                        

April 8, 15

Instructor(s): Kenneth D. Alford

This course will focus on online research of World War II records, principally on www.Fold3.com and the European Theater of Operations. Fold3 contains 537,657,582 records of which 143,281,542 records pertain to World War II, primarily images from the National Archives. Additionally, many other websites will be discussed. Students should bring the name and service number of someone they would enjoy researching.

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Defeating Hitler: Unsung Heroes, Rodent bombs and Heavy Water                                       

Tuesday                                              HS191393           

11:30-1:00                          

April 9, 16, 30

Instructor(s): Terry Karselis

This course will present several little-known top-secret operations that had a profound effect on history. Topics covered will include: Winston Churchill’s Toy Box, Winston Churchill’s Band of Sisters and the Heavy Water War. Come learn about strange and peculiar creations that helped defeat Hitler’s war machine, the brave and nearly forgotten women who helped defeat the Nazis, and how the Allies delayed Hitler from producing an atom bomb.

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Dora the Explorer: Applied Psychologist and Cartographer                                         

Wednesday                                      HS191366           

9:30-10:30                          

April 10

Instructor(s): Jim Carter

When the instructor was teaching a course in maps and cartography, one of his students mentioned his 18-month-old son knew what a map was because of watching Dora the Explorer. “Wow,” he thought! The literature does not recognize map use in children that young. He investigated and was impressed with the research and efforts behind the design and production of Dora the Explorer. Dora is very popular around the world. Of course, Dora always uses two languages, whatever might be appropriate where she is. Jim continued to dig and ultimately wrote three articles about Dora and maps. This course will reflect on what he learned about Dora the Explorer and maps and will offer thoughts and perspectives. He hopes to hear stories about Dora the Explorer from the students who are also grandparents.

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Muslim Women and the 21st Century                                  

Wednesday                                      HS191298           

1:30-3:00                             

April 17

Instructor(s): Maha Shawky Whitfield

Last year, Ethiopia had the first female president, the “Me Too” movement was very strong in the USA, and women started driving in Saudi Arabia! These were new beginnings for women not because of religion but because of politics, tradition and the media. Did you know Indonesia is the largest Muslim country not in the Middle East and 800,000 Muslim women live in 45 Muslim countries? This course will cover these topics as well as forced marriages in Muslim families, Muslim women running banks and even a Muslim woman driving a Formula One car in the French Grand Prix. Students will learn the truth and how much of what they think they know is because of religion instead of customs and traditions.

                                ______________________________


The Fall of Richmond on April 2, 1865                                    

Monday                                              HS191382           

11:30-12:30                        

April 22

Instructor(s): Hank Holland

The fall of Richmond, the night of April 2, 1865, is known as the night they drove old Dixie down. The Confederate Government, Army and the citizens left behind in Richmond on that fateful night will be the topic of this course. Students will enjoy a lecture, brochures and a video presentation.

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The New American Civil War Museum: The Antidote for Charlottesville                                             

Tuesday                                              HS191403           

9:30-10:30                          

April 23

Instructor(s): Waite Rawls

The new American Civil War Museum will open in March 2019, and many believe it will be the "antidote for Charlottesville," a place for civil and credible discourse about our nation's history. The instructor will review the museum's new exhibits with words, photos, and an always stimulating question and answer session.

                                ______________________________


Vietnam War Veterans: In Their Own Words                                     

Wednesday                                      HS191399           

1:30-3:30                             

April 24

Instructor(s): James Triesler

Come learn about the diversity of the Vietnam War from those who lived it. Virginia War Memorial Education Director, Jim Triesler, will lead a veteran panel who will share their Vietnam experiences from 50 years ago.

                                ______________________________


The Elizabethan Secret Service                                

Thursday                                            HS191394           

9:30-11:00                          

April 25

Instructor(s): Terry Karselis

This course will present the spies and techniques of Queen Elizabeth I’s court that gave birth to today’s British Secret Intelligence Service, known as MI6. Come learn about the little-known, top-secret operations that had a profound effect on history.

                                ______________________________

 

About Fees
Your Lifelong Learning Institute membership gives you access to all of LLI classes and trips, most without any additional costs. There are some classes and trips which require additional fees. Where there are additional fees, those fees must be paid at the time of registration. Fees can be paid by check, cash or credit card. If paying by check, please clearly indicate the classes and trips being covered.