Midlothian, VA. 804.378.2527

Lifelong Learning Chesterfield

History, Humanities and International Studies - Summer 2019              


Lifelong Learning Institute 
in Chesterfield                         

                                                                                    Not an LLI member? Join here now. It's easy!   

George Washington A: The Indispensable Man                                               

Tuesday                                              HS192236           

9:30-11:00                          

May 7, 14, 21, 28, June 4, 18, 25, July 9, 16, 23

Instructor(s): Shep Smith

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. George Washington is known as the "Father of our Country." He led Americans to independence from the British, over-saw the writing of the U.S. Constitution, and served two terms as President of the U.S. Most historians recognize him as the only indispensable man in American history. Most revolutions in world history ended in dictatorship. George Washington laid down military power and then political power and returned to being a private citizen after creating our free republic. In addition to his public life, this course will examine his family life, his rocky relationship with Thomas Jefferson, and his opinions on slavery and religion.

                                ______________________________


Global Cultural Geography: The Middle East Past and Present                                  

Tuesday                                              HS192087           

11:30-1:00                          

May 7, 14

Instructor(s): William Seay

Cultural geography is one of the two major branches of geography (versus physical geography) and is often called human geography. Cultural geography is the study of the many cultural aspects found throughout the world and how they relate to the spaces and places where they originate and then travel as people continually move across various areas.

                                ______________________________


Einstein, the Quantum World and Schrödinger's Cat                                     

Wednesday                                      HS192037           

9:30-11:30                          

May 8, 15, 22, 29, June 5, 12

Instructor(s): Glenn Markus

What is "really" real? And, how has the history of physics contributed to our current understanding of the world around us? Einstein theorized about the laws of physics operating in the universe and developed new notions about time and space. He also put forward even more revolutionary ideas about gravity that overturned the influence of Newtonian physics, but other thinkers explored other peculiar properties of the quantum world that challenge our traditional ideas of "reality." This course is a non-mathematical review of how modern physics radically has changed in the last hundred years.

                                ______________________________


Anthropology Discussion A:  A Fractured Continent (Part 2)                                       

Wednesday                                      HS192337           

12:00-1:30                          

May 8, June 12, July 10, Aug 14

Instructor(s): Annebel Lewis

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. This is a DISCUSSION Group.  Anthropology studies not only what we’ve learned about the past and other cultures, but how we can apply what we’ve learned in order to better understand the present.  Disregard the conventional map of North America.  The lines on the map slash through cohesive cultures, cultural forces that have driven the affairs of our sprawling continent.  Each of our founding cultures had its own set of cherished principles, and they often contradicted one another.  These distinct cultures developed in remarkable isolation from one another, consolidating unique values, practices, dialects, and ideals.  These cultures are still with us today and have spread their people, ideas, and influences across mutually exclusive bands of the continent. Part II will discuss the Deep South, Greater Appalachia, Spanish Caribbean and New France. Part III (next session) will cover the remaining cultural regions. Suggested reading is “American Nations” by Colin Woodward.

                                ______________________________


George Washington B: The Indispensable Man                                

Thursday                                            HS192406           

9:30-11:00                          

May 9, 16, 23, 30, June 6, 20, 27, July 11, 18, 25

Instructor(s): Shep Smith

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. George Washington is known as the "Father of our Country." He led Americans to independence from the British, over-saw the writing of the U.S. Constitution, and served two terms as President of the U.S. Most historians recognize him as the only indispensable man in American history. Most revolutions in world history ended in dictatorship. George Washington laid down military power and then political power and returned to being a private citizen after creating our free republic. In addition to his public life, this course will examine his family life, his rocky relationship with Thomas Jefferson, and his opinions on slavery and religion.

                                ______________________________


American Civil War Times in Chesterfield County, Virginia                                         

Wednesday                                      HS192364           

10:30-11:30                        

May 15

Instructor(s): Hank Holland

This course will present students with a slide presentation of Civil War sites and stories that occurred throughout Chesterfield County between 1861 and 1865.

                                ______________________________


The Story of Emily Winfree: A Life Rediscovered                                             

Wednesday                                      HS192415           

1:00-2:30                             

May 15

Instructor(s): Virginia Refo and Dr. Jan Meck

In Shockoe Bottom there sits a small cottage on a trailer. In 1866 it was given to a former slave, Emily Winfree, by the father of several of her children, David Winfree. David was her previous owner. After his death in 1867, Emily struggled to raise her children in the cottage. It is perhaps the only survivor of hundreds of like Reconstruction homes built in Manchester for recently emancipated slaves. Saved from demolition in 2002 it has yet to find a permanent home. Two research volunteers from the Virginia Museum of History and Culture (VMHC) have unfolded the story of Emily and David and have found many living descendants. Hear this remarkable story of one woman's strength and perseverance under the harsh conditions of slavery, Reconstruction and Jim Crow.

                                ______________________________


The Islands of Ireland                                   

Tuesday                                              HS192409           

1:00-2:00                             

May 21, 28, June 4, 11, 18, 25

Instructor(s): John Countryman

Ireland is the third largest island in Europe and is itself surrounded by approximately 80 islands of significant size, of which only about 20 are inhabited. We’ll “visit” several of those 20 and even a couple that don’t actually exist (except in the fertile minds of Irish storytellers)!

                                ______________________________


Great Decisions                                               

Tuesday                                              HS192089            *$35

1:30-3:00                             

May 21, June 18, July 16, Aug 27

Instructor(s): Bob Ferguson

This course will continue using the Foreign Policy Association's Great Decisions 2019 book in a monthly discussion of international affairs topics. This session, two topics will come from the book, and we will also consider the politics and economics of two important countries - Australia and Japan. Topics are: Australia (May), Japan (June), The Rise of Populism in Europe (July), US - China Trade (August). The book is available for purchase through LLI during Open Registration only, but it is not required for the course.

                                ______________________________


Flying Squirrels Baseball: A Word from Parney                                 

Wednesday                                      HS192258           

10:30-11:30                        

May 22

Instructor(s): Todd "Parney" Parnell

Todd "Parney" Parnell serves as the Vice President and Chief Operating Officer for the Richmond Flying Squirrels, the Double-A affiliate of the San Francisco Giants. In that role, he oversees all aspects of the Flying Squirrels' day-to-day operations in Richmond. In this course, he will share all about the Richmond Flying Squirrels, what the team does, how they're involved in the community and how they fit into the city of Richmond. He has also invited members of LLI for a special tour of the stadium and clubhouse on Friday, May 24th. See SE192088 for details and register separately for the local trip!

                                ______________________________


Current Events Discussion A                                      

Wednesday                                      HS192003           

12:30-2:00                          

May 22

Instructor(s): Fred Nelson

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. This class will begin with a short introduction by the moderator, who will suggest current event topics of international, national, state, and local importance.  Students will determine the choice of topics for a round-table discussion in which everyone's viewpoint is important and during which differing opinions are always respected.

                                ______________________________


Anthropology Discussion B:  A Fractured Continent (Part 2)                                        

Wednesday                                      HS192338           

1:30-3:00                             

May 22, June 26, July 24, Aug 28

Instructor(s): Annebel Lewis

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. This is a DISCUSSION Group.  Anthropology studies not only what we’ve learned about the past and other cultures, but how we can apply what we’ve learned in order to better understand the present.  Disregard the conventional map of North America.  The lines on the map slash through cohesive cultures, cultural forces that have driven the affairs of our sprawling continent.  Each of our founding cultures had its own set of cherished principles, and they often contradicted one another.  These distinct cultures developed in remarkable isolation from one another, consolidating unique values, practices, dialects, and ideals.  These cultures are still with us today and have spread their people, ideas, and influences across mutually exclusive bands of the continent. Part II will discuss the Deep South, Greater Appalachia, Spanish Caribbean and New France. Part III (next session) will cover the remaining cultural regions. Suggested reading is “American Nations” by Colin Woodward.

                                ______________________________


Current Events Discussion B                                      

Wednesday                                      HS192004           

2:15-3:45                             

May 22

Instructor(s): Fred Nelson

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. This class will begin with a short introduction by the moderator, who will suggest current event topics of international, national, state, and local importance.  Students will determine the choice of topics for a round-table discussion in which everyone's viewpoint is important and during which differing opinions are always respected.

                                ______________________________


Audubon's America A: Wild Times                                         

Tuesday                                              HS192395           

9:00-10:30                          

May 28, June 4, 11, 18

Instructor(s): Patricia Ryther

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. A young man in a young nation, John James Audubon had the ambitious goal of painting all the birds of America, life-size. The still-new United States was mostly wilderness, and Audubon had a small business to run and a family to support. His beloved wife, Lucy, didn’t always support his efforts, and he labored without success for years. He had little formal training in art or science, and he suffered personal rejection and financial ruin. But Audubon never gave up, and when he finally took his portfolio of paintings to Europe, his dream came true. He not only painted the birds but studied their habits, their biology, and added to the scientific understanding of how birds migrate, care for their young, and live in the natural world. This course will follow Audubon and get familiar with his world, a time of explosive growth and rapid technological change. Students will examine some of the obstacles to his success, from physical danger to personal insult, and the legacy he left for the conservationists who would follow.

                                ______________________________


Anthropology: The Divine Horsemen and Vodou                                            

Friday                                  HS192002           

10:00-11:30                        

May 31

Instructor(s): Annebel Lewis

Forget about the Hollywood version of Vodou. In New Orleans they say that vodou is to religion what jazz is to music. It is eclectic and mysterious, always changing. There is a world they let you see, but an unknown world lies behind the closed doors. It is a belief system, not a religion. It is monotheistic, but there is no dogma, no churches or temples, no priestly class, and no bureaucracy. Music, dance, and artistic expression are the heart of and soul of vodou. The Loa dance among the shadows. Suggested reading: “The Divine Horsemen” by Maya Deren.

                                ______________________________


The New American Civil War Museum: The Antidote for Charlottesville                                             

Wednesday                                      HS192403           

10:30-11:30                        

June 5

Instructor(s): Waite Rawls

The new museum will open on May 4th, and this course will cover what is included at the museum and the public's reaction to it. What did the press say? What sorts of comments were made by visitors? How does it address the pressing need in America to address some of the legacies of the Civil War? As always, there will be a stimulating question and answer session.

                                ______________________________


Adolf Hitler                                       

Monday                                              HS192322           

11:15-12:45                        

June 10

Instructor(s): Kenneth D. Alford

Few stories are better known or more poorly documented than that of the women seduced by Adolf Hitler and his final days in a Berlin Bunker. Only two women have emerged with any clarity from Adolf Hitler's shadowy private life: his youthful niece, Geli Raubal, and Eva Braun. Both died violent deaths at their own hands as did four others. Popular imagination the world over has been quick to seize on the macabre details of those affairs and the last days in the bunker in flaming Berlin, where a mad genius cringed in the rain of Soviet artillery and felt the walls of his terrible world closing in upon him. This course will cover the suicide of his scheming henchman, the defection of those who fattened on the blood he had spilled, the last-minute marriage with his blowzy mistress Eva Braun, the suicide pact they made together, and the final dispatch of their bodies to Valhalla in the flames of a funeral pyre. All this and more wrote a tawdry Wagnerian finish to this evil story.

                                ______________________________


Building the Diamond Baseball Stadium                                              

Wednesday                                      HS192360           

10:30-12:00                        

June 12

Instructor(s): Thomas Hanson

This course will be based on the professional engineering background of the instructor who was the structural engineer of the Diamond Baseball Stadium in Richmond. The design and construction of the 12,500-seat stadium, which was built in six months between the 1984 and 1985 seasons, will be presented.

                                ______________________________


The Progressive Era and the 1920s: All That Jazz                                               

Thursday                                            HS192413           

9:30-11:00                          

June 13

Instructor(s): Hilliary Turner

This course will examine the link between the Progressive Era and the 1920s and detail how it still shapes our world today.

                                ______________________________


Adventures of Hiking the Camino de Santiago in Europe                                             

Thursday                                            HS192381           

1:00-3:00                             

June 20

Instructor(s): Robert Abbott

The Camino is a series of paths and trails in Europe that all converge in the city of Santiago in northwest Spain, the resting spot for the bones of St. James. Since the 11th century, pilgrims have hiked the Camino to cleanse their souls. In more recent times the hike has changed from purely religious reasons to more spiritual and social reasons. This course is tailored to those who are possibly interested in hiking the Camino as well as those interested in learning more about the history and background of the Camino. There will be time for questions at the end!

                                ______________________________


Tinbridge Hill                                   

Wednesday                                      HS192412           

10:30-12:00                        

June 26

Instructor(s): DuBois Miller

This course will be based on the instructor’s two autobiographies: Ten on Tin and Three More on Tin. He will share why and how he wrote the books which describe his early life on Tinbridge Hill, the first and most impoverished African-American neighborhood in Lynchburg, Virginia. The period from 1950-1963 will be covered which is when the city transitioned from segregation to integration.

                                ______________________________


Nazi Millionaires                                            

Wednesday                                      HS192286           

10:30-12:00                        

July 10

Instructor(s): Kenneth D. Alford

During the final days of World War II, German SS officers crammed trains, cars, and trucks full of gold, currency, and jewels, and headed for the mountains of Austria. Fearful of arrest and determined to keep the stolen loot out of Allied hands they concealed their treasures and fled. Although most of the men were eventually apprehended, many managed to evade capture making their way into South America. The intensive postwar Allied investigation that followed recovered but a sliver of this mountain of gold. Nazi Millionaires is based upon thousands of pages of unpublished and recently declassified intelligence memorandums, police reports, letters diaries, journals and related documents. We follow Adolf Eichmann who made a last ditch effort to hide millions in gold in a small Austrian pasture before fleeing to Argentina. The real story behind SS officer Kurt Becher and Zionist Rudolf Kastner, who traded their souls for gold in Budapest is revealed. Also the enigmatic, Frederick Schwend with his fortune along with Klaus Barbie and their getaway into South America is detailed. The personal items belonging to Adolf Hitler, Eva Braun other Nazis were of interest to the Allies. What happened to these valuables and what fate befell these people? Students will have an opportunity to explore these areas in detail.

                                ______________________________


The UFO in American Cultural History A: Are They Out There?                                  

Friday                                  HS192407           

9:30-11:00                          

July 12

Instructor(s): Dr. John Lemza

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. The “Modern UFO Period” began in June 1947 with the daytime sighting of an unexplained supersonic speed aircraft. Since that time, Unidentified Flying Objects have become a part of American historical culture inspiring movies, books, comics, and frequent sightings. Among those bearing witness were rocker Mick Jagger and President Jimmy Carter. Historians trace sightings back thousands of years, and the debate concerning their existence offers compelling evidence both for and against their existence. Are they real? Do they exist? How have they influenced our culture? Join us, as we look to history for some answers.

                                ______________________________


The Fall of Richmond: April 2, 1865                                         

Monday                                              HS192382           

11:30-12:30                        

July 15

Instructor(s): Hank Holland

The fall of Richmond, the night of April 2, 1865, is known as the night they drove old Dixie down. The Confederate Government, Army and the citizens left behind in Richmond on that fateful night will be the topic of this course. Students will enjoy a lecture, brochures and a video presentation.

                                ______________________________


Audubon's America B: Wild Times                                         

Tuesday                                              HS192410           

9:00-10:30                          

July 16, 23, 30, Aug 6

Instructor(s): Patricia Ryther

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. A young man in a young nation, John James Audubon had the ambitious goal of painting all the birds of America, life-size. The still-new United States was mostly wilderness, and Audubon had a small business to run and a family to support. His beloved wife, Lucy, didn’t always support his efforts, and he labored without success for years. He had little formal training in art or science, and he suffered personal rejection and financial ruin. But Audubon never gave up, and when he finally took his portfolio of paintings to Europe, his dream came true. He not only painted the birds but studied their habits, their biology, and added to the scientific understanding of how birds migrate, care for their young, and live in the natural world. This course will follow Audubon and get familiar with his world, a time of explosive growth and rapid technological change. Students will examine some of the obstacles to his success, from physical danger to personal insult, and the legacy he left for the conservationists who would follow.

                                ______________________________


The Richmond Coal Basin                                            

Wednesday                                      HS192311           

10:30-12:30                        

July 31

Instructor(s): Peppy Jones

This course will cover 230 years of Midlothian history including coal mining in the Richmond Basin, creation of roads, railroads, and raids by the British and Union Forces.

                                ______________________________


Local Government in Chesterfield County                                          

Wednesday                                      HS192368           

1:00-2:30                             

July 31

Instructor(s): Dr. Joseph P. Casey

Join the Chesterfield County Administrator for this course to learn about how the local government is working in Chesterfield County. Hear about what the focuses are for this year, what is new and bring your own questions for him to answer.

                                ______________________________


The UFO in American Cultural History B: Are They Out There?                                  

Thursday                                            HS192408           

9:30-11:00                          

Aug 1

Instructor(s): Dr. John Lemza

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. The “Modern UFO Period” began in June 1947 with the daytime sighting of an unexplained supersonic speed aircraft. Since that time, Unidentified Flying Objects have become a part of American historical culture inspiring movies, books, comics, and frequent sightings. Among those bearing witness were rocker Mick Jagger and President Jimmy Carter. Historians trace sightings back thousands of years, and the debate concerning their existence offers compelling evidence both for and against their existence. Are they real? Do they exist? How have they influenced our culture? Join us, as we look to history for some answers.

                                ______________________________


Civil War Museum Treasures                                    

Tuesday                                              HS192330           

9:30-10:30                          

Aug 6

Instructor(s): Kenneth D. Alford

A Bible, an officer's mess kit, a cane arm chair and a blood stained note…At first glance these items might not seem to have much in common. But in closer examination they prove to be some of the most interesting artifacts of the Civil War. This course details memorabilia in museums in 21 states and provides matchless artifacts in their collections. The museums are described with details on how each artifact came to be in that location, and a narrative about each item will be presented.

                                ______________________________


Defending Richmond 1861-1865                                              

Wednesday                                      HS192411           

10:30-11:30                        

Aug 7

Instructor(s): Hank Holland

This course will present students with a slide show and lecture on the outer defenses of Richmond during the American Civil War.

                                ______________________________


Amazing Leaders: Nelson and Napoleon                                             

Thursday                                            HS192390           

9:30-11:00                          

Aug 8, 15

Instructor(s): Martin Fisher

This course will explain how two amazing men: UK's Admiral Nelson and France's Napoleon Bonaparte arose to their positions as the finest Admiral and finest General that ever lived (and the gap between their seconds is enormous). Although they never met despite living 150 miles and born 10 years apart, their lives became forever entwined via their English and French wartime exploits.

                                ______________________________


Shockoe Hill Cemetery: Richmond's First "Burying Ground"                                      

Wednesday                                      HS192414           

1:00-3:00                             

Aug 14

Instructor(s): Jeffry Burden

Richmonders of the early 1800s realized they needed a better way to bury their departed citizens. Shockoe Hill Cemetery (or "Burying Ground", as it was first called) was the attempt by City fathers to regularize that unpleasant but necessary urban reality, in a metropolis where churchyard burials or scattered family plots would no longer suffice. For three generations, from 1822 until the rise to prominence of Hollywood Cemetery in the decades after the Civil War, this site just north of downtown was the destination of choice for both the elite and commoners of Richmond. They found their rest in a planned and organized setting, designed for both reverence and efficiency. The leading names of 19th-century Richmond -- Marshall, Haxall, Cabell, Mayo, Branch, Chevallie, Van Lew, and many others -- can be found at Shockoe Hill. This course will examine the roots and development of this Cemetery from its humble start as an isolated four-acre plot, to its most prominent days in the years leading up to and during the Civil War, to its long years of decline -- and now to its future as a welcome green space, and again a working cemetery, in a section of Richmond on the verge of rejuvenation. The course will also reveal the lives of individuals whose stories are so much a part of what Richmond was and what it has become.

                                ______________________________

About Fees
Your Lifelong Learning Institute membership gives you access to all of LLI classes and trips, most without any additional costs. There are some classes and trips which require additional fees. Where there are additional fees, those fees must be paid at the time of registration. Fees can be paid by check, cash or credit card. If paying by check, please clearly indicate the classes and trips being covered.