Midlothian, VA. 804.378.2527

Lifelong Learning Chesterfield

History, Humanities and International Studies - Fall 2019              


Lifelong Learning Institute 
in Chesterfield                         

                                                                                    Not an LLI member? Join here now. It's easy!   

Abraham Lincoln A: Humble Man, Great President                                         

Tuesday                                              HS193416           

9:30-11:00                          

Sept 3, 10, 17, 24, Oct 1, 8, 15, 22

Instructor(s): Shep Smith

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. As the nation approached the 1860 election, the country was divided over the issues of slavery and states' rights. Communities, political parties, families and even church denominations were split. The best political minds and compromises had failed to resolve the issues. Abraham Lincoln was born in a one-room log cabin with a dirt floor and had grown up in poverty. He probably only had one year of formal education but read every book that he could borrow. At an early age he joined his father in the fields and gained so much skill with an ax that he became known as "the rail splitter." He hated manual labor and preferred to spend time reading which caused conflict with his father. He left home as soon as possible and worked a number of jobs while he read law. He then became one of the most successful lawyers in Illinois. When Lincoln was elected the sixteenth president in 1860, the American people did not know what to expect. His resume' was largely blank. He had never been vice president, a senator, a governor, a cabinet officer, or a general. He had only served one undistinguished term in the House. Yet this unknown country lawyer successfully led the nation through its greatest crisis of the Civil War and is now considered to be one of its greatest presidents.

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Civil War Times in Chesterfield County, Virginia                               

Tuesday                                              HS193364           

11:30-12:30                        

Sept 3

Instructor(s): Hank Holland

This course will present students with a slide presentation of Civil War sites and stories that occurred throughout Chesterfield County between 1861 and 1865.

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Daily Life in Ancient Rome                                          

Wednesday                                      HS193181           

9:30-11:30                          

Sept 4, 11, 18, 25, Oct 2, 9

Instructor(s): Glenn Markus

Republican and Imperial Rome had an immeasurable impact on the shape of the Western World, but there is more to understanding Rome than its great armies and conquests or its architectural and engineering achievements. Rome was populated with very ordinary people - citizens, artisans, and slaves who dealt with more mundane and every day concerns. This course is about ordinary Romans, how they lived, where they worked, how they amused themselves, and what they ate and drank. An extensive syllabus will be provided.

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Abraham Lincoln B: Humble Man, Great President                                         

Thursday                                            HS193417           

9:30-11:00                          

Sept 5, 12, 19, 26, Oct 3, 10, 17, 24

Instructor(s): Shep Smith

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. As the nation approached the 1860 election, the country was divided over the issues of slavery and states' rights. Communities, political parties, families and even church denominations were split. The best political minds and compromises had failed to resolve the issues. Abraham Lincoln was born in a one-room log cabin with a dirt floor and had grown up in poverty. He probably only had one year of formal education but read every book that he could borrow. At an early age he joined his father in the fields and gained so much skill with an ax that he became known as "the rail splitter." He hated manual labor and preferred to spend time reading which caused conflict with his father. He left home as soon as possible and worked a number of jobs while he read law. He then became one of the most successful lawyers in Illinois. When Lincoln was elected the sixteenth president in 1860, the American people did not know what to expect. His resume' was largely blank. He had never been vice president, a senator, a governor, a cabinet officer, or a general. He had only served one undistinguished term in the House. Yet this unknown country lawyer successfully led the nation through its greatest crisis of the Civil War and is now considered to be one of its greatest presidents.

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The American West:  History, Myth and Legacy                                

Thursday                                            HS193420           

11:30-1:00                          

Sept 5, 12, 19, 26, Oct 3, 10

Instructor(s): Timothy Pace

This course will cover 200 years of frontier history including the transcontinental railway, the trail of tears, manifest destiny, the gold rush, and cowboys and cattle. There will also be a discussion on the west in popular culture. A Great Courses DVD will be viewed (two lectures per class), and students will be encouraged to participate in discussion following each lecture.

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Islam and the Architecture of Mosques                                

Thursday                                            HS193121           

1:30-3:00                             

Sept 5, 12, 19

Instructor(s): Hans Oppe

This course will take students to mosques in North Africa, Turkey, Iran and India. The instructor will open a window into the World of Islam as students learn about: Part 1 - Islam and the Architecture of Mosques in North Africa and Turkey; Part 2 - Islam and the Architecture of Mosques in Iran; and Part 3 - Islam and Mausoleums in India.

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History of the United States                                      

Monday                                              HS193421           

9:30-11:00                          

Sept 9, 16, 23, 30, Oct 7, 21

Instructor(s): Timothy Pace

The instructor will moderate this course from the discovery of the Americas to the time of the American revolution. Manifest destiny from our European settlers, conquistadors and many other topics will be covered. A Great Courses DVD will be viewed (two lectures per class), and students will be encouraged to participate in discussion following each lecture.

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Ancient Places: In the Steps of Richard Halliburton                                         

Tuesday                                              HS193435           

11:30-1:00                          

Sept 10

Instructor(s): Rick Kinnaird

In this very brief introduction, this course will look at Angkor Wat, Petra, Boropudur and sites in the Mayan world to see what has changed since Halliburton roamed the globe in the first part of the 20th century and what remains the same.

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Anthropology Discussion A:  A Fractured Continent (Part 3)                                        

Wednesday                                      HS193337           

12:00-1:30                          

Sept 11, Oct 9, Nov 13, Dec 11

Instructor(s): Annebel Lewis

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. This is a DISCUSSION Group.  Anthropology studies not only what we’ve learned about the past and other cultures, but how we can apply what we’ve learned in order to better understand the present.  Disregard the conventional map of North America.  The lines on the map slash through cohesive cultures, cultural forces that have driven the affairs of our sprawling continent.  Each of our founding cultures had its own set of cherished principles, and they often contradicted one another.  These distinct cultures developed in remarkable isolation from one another, consolidating unique values, practices, dialects, and ideals.  These cultures are still with us today and have spread their people, ideas, and influences across mutually exclusive bands of the continent. Part III will cover El Norte, Left Coast, Far West, and New Nations. Suggested reading is “American Nations” by Colin Woodward.

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Tinbridge Hill (Part 2)                                    

Wednesday                                      HS193429           

1:00-2:30                             

Sept 11

Instructor(s): DuBois Miller

This course will be a continuation of the first course held in the Summer 2019 session. Students will continue to focus on the characteristics of the Tinbridge Hill neighborhood and life in the community. Particular attention will be given to the map and handouts from the first course.

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Fort Lee: Island of Integration                                   

Monday                                              HS193437           

11:30-12:30                        

Sept 16

Instructor(s): Jimmy Price

As our nation fought abroad in World War II, the stirrings of another fight were beginning at home. Follow the journey of African American women in the Women's Army Corps as they experience the desegregation of the US Army at Fort Lee. This story will be told using original photographs, documents, and newspaper clippings from the era.

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Great Decisions                               

Tuesday                                              HS193089            *$35

1:30-3:00                             

Sept 17, Oct 15, Nov 19, Dec 10

Instructor(s): Bob Ferguson

This course will continue using the Foreign Policy Association's Great Decisions 2019 book in a monthly discussion of international affairs topics. The final three topics are: September - Cyber Conflict and Geopolitics; October - The United States and Mexico, a Partnership Tested; November - State of the State Department and Diplomacy. In December, a review of the year’s topics and any updates on current foreign affairs issues will be discussed. The book is available for purchase through LLI during Open Registration only, but it is not required for the course.

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Current Events Discussion A                                       

Wednesday                                      HS193003           

12:30-2:00                          

Sept 18, Oct 23, Nov 20, Dec 18

Instructor(s): Roy Dahlquist

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. This course will begin with a short introduction by the moderator, who will suggest current event topics of international, national, state, and local importance.  Students will determine the choice of topics for a round-table discussion in which everyone's viewpoint is important and during which differing opinions are always respected.

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Current Events Discussion B                                       

Wednesday                                      HS193004           

2:15-3:45                             

Sept 18, Oct 23, Nov 20, Dec 18

Instructor(s): Roy Dahlquist

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. This course will begin with a short introduction by the moderator, who will suggest current event topics of international, national, state, and local importance.  Students will determine the choice of topics for a round-table discussion in which everyone's viewpoint is important and during which differing opinions are always respected.

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Civil War Facts: States of Disbelief                                         

Monday                                              HS193419           

11:15-12:45                        

Sept 23, 30, Oct 7, 21, 28, Nov 4, 18, 25, Dec 2, 9

Instructor(s): Edward Blackwell

Which amphibious operation was halted by ship size? Can you name two American hobbies and one part of your daily routine begun by the Civil War? What were the roles of Hawaii, California, New Mexico, and Oklahoma during the war? Which of four famous Civil War generals was first in his class? Last? How were partisans to be treated when captured? Which future Congressman forced a ship to change sides? Who was the first woman to lead U.S. soldiers into battle? What Virginian enlisted at age nine and eventually won two crucial battles for the Union? When did the C.S.A. enter battles from the north side? Answers to these questions and much more will take you back to a time when “states of disbelief” were the norm.

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Pocahontas State Park: There's Something for Everyone                                              

Wednesday                                      HS193398           

1:00-2:00                             

Sept 25

Instructor(s): Rebecca Whalen

From shipwrecks to an 18th century fort, from kayaks to hiking sticks, and from birds to snakes--there's something for everyone at Virginia's State Parks! Join a Ranger to learn more about the history, wildlife, and recreational and volunteer opportunities of your local state park, Pocahontas. Students will also virtually travel to various other parks within the Commonwealth. Built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the 1930s, Pocahontas is now the largest state park with nearly 8,000 acres and offers activities for all ages.

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Anthropology Discussion B:  A Fractured Continent (Part 3)                                        

Wednesday                                      HS193338           

1:30-3:00                             

Sept 25, Oct 23, Nov 20, Dec 18

Instructor(s): Annebel Lewis

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. This is a DISCUSSION Group.  Anthropology studies not only what we’ve learned about the past and other cultures, but how we can apply what we’ve learned in order to better understand the present.  Disregard the conventional map of North America.  The lines on the map slash through cohesive cultures, cultural forces that have driven the affairs of our sprawling continent.  Each of our founding cultures had its own set of cherished principles, and they often contradicted one another.  These distinct cultures developed in remarkable isolation from one another, consolidating unique values, practices, dialects, and ideals.  These cultures are still with us today and have spread their people, ideas, and influences across mutually exclusive bands of the continent. Part III will cover El Norte, Left Coast, Far West, and New Nations. Suggested reading is “American Nations” by Colin Woodward.

                                ______________________________

Gold in the East Coast Hills                                        

Wednesday                                      HS193431           

2:30-3:30                             

Sept 25

Instructor(s): Bill Kump

There is an abundance of gold on the East Coast that you can still find by panning and sluicing. Most of the large gold deposits in the United States were found in the West, which has overshadowed many of the gold discoveries that were made in the East. In fact, prior to the California gold rush, there were thousands of miners in several eastern states that were making a living by mining for gold. Is there any gold left? This course will focus on discovering gold in the East Coast hills.

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The Seven Days Battles around Richmond                                           

Tuesday                                              HS193436           

11:30-12:30                        

Oct 1

Instructor(s): Waite Rawls

In May of 1862, the Union Army was on the outskirts of Richmond. Richmond's fall and the end of the Confederacy were almost imminent. But Robert E. Lee took command of the Confederate Army; and, in a series of battles around Richmond, drove the Union Army away from the city, not to return for two years. This was the true "turning point" of the war. This course will cover the history of the battles and their significance. It will also cover how a Richmond area resident can tour them.

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Racial Segregation: Then and Now                                          

Friday                                  HS193418            *$23

10:00-12:00                        

Oct 4

Instructor(s): Margaret Edds and Dr. John Moeser

This course will provide a look at Jim Crow practices in Virginia and the nation in the early 20th Century and their enduring legacy in educational and housing segregation in the Richmond area. The first hour will focus on “We Face the Dawn: Oliver Hill, Spottswood Robinson, and the Legal Team That Dismantled Jim Crow,” a dual biography of two seminal civil rights figures from Richmond, published in 2018. The second half will be a conversation between author Margaret Edds and scholar-historian-activist John Moeser about the current state of racial integration or separation in the Richmond area. Students will be encouraged to ask questions and join in the discussion. If you would like a copy of the book, simply pay the optional course fee at time of registration, and you will receive your signed copy at the class!

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Adventures of Hiking the Camino de Santiago in Europe                                              

Thursday                                            HS193381           

1:30-3:30                             

Oct 10

Instructor(s): Robert Abbott

The Camino is a series of paths and trails in Europe that all converge in the city of Santiago in northwest Spain, the resting spot for the bones of St. James. Since the 11th century, pilgrims have hiked the Camino to cleanse their souls. In more recent times the hike has changed from purely religious reasons to more spiritual and social reasons. This course is tailored to those who are possibly interested in hiking the Camino as well as those interested in learning more about the history and background of the Camino. There will be time for questions at the end!

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Audubon's America: Wild Times                                              

Wednesday                                      HS193395           

9:30-11:00                          

Oct 16, 23, 30, Nov 6

Instructor(s): Patricia Ryther

A young man in a young nation, John James Audubon had the ambitious goal of painting all the birds of America, life-size. The still-new United States was mostly wilderness, and Audubon had a small business to run and a family to support. His beloved wife, Lucy, didn’t always support his efforts, and he labored without success for years. He had little formal training in art or science, and he suffered personal rejection and financial ruin. But Audubon never gave up, and when he finally took his portfolio of paintings to Europe, his dream came true. He not only painted the birds but studied their habits, their biology, and added to the scientific understanding of how birds migrate, care for their young, and live in the natural world. This course will follow Audubon and get familiar with his world, a time of explosive growth and rapid technological change. Students will examine some of the obstacles to his success, from physical danger to personal insult, and the legacy he left for the conservationists who would follow.

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Chesterfield in World War I Centennial A                                            

Tuesday                                              HS193425           

11:30-12:30                        

Oct 22

Instructor(s): Bryan Truzzie

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. This course will focus on the history of Chesterfield's role during WWI and cover the significance of the centennial that was held at the 1917 Courthouse in November of 2018.

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First Baptist Church of Midlothian: A Rich History                                           

Tuesday                                              HS193267           

9:30-10:30                          

Oct 29

Instructor(s): Audrey M. Ross

This course will present a brief history of the First Baptist Church of Midlothian (our neighbor's across the street), which is the oldest African American Church in Chesterfield County! Information on the history, contributions, and accomplishments of the African Americans in the Village of Midlothian will also be shared.

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Letters from the South: 1863-1865                                          

Tuesday                                              HS193434           

11:00-12:00                        

Oct 29

Instructor(s): James D. Hodge

This course will provide a look at the life of an Ohio farm boy who enlisted in the Union Army during the Civil War as told in his many letters home. He was looking for adventure but got more than he bargained for serving in the 17th Ohio Infantry in campaigns from Chattanooga to Atlanta and beyond as a private in Sherman's army.

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The Chase of the Bismarck: Duel in the Atlantic                                

Thursday                                            HS193438           

9:00-11:00                          

Oct 31

Instructor(s): Christopher L. Kolakowski

The chase of the German Battleship Bismarck in May 1941 is one of the greatest sea stories of all time. It was also a pivotal moment in the Battle of the Atlantic. This course will discuss the story, its twists and turns, and effect on the war at sea.

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1917 Chesterfield Courthouse Centennial A                                       

Thursday                                            HS193423           

2:30-3:30                             

Oct 31

Instructor(s): Bryan Truzzie

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. This course will address the history surrounding the historic 1917 Chesterfield Courthouse and present some of the significance regarding the 2017 Centennial festivities.

                                ______________________________

Rethinking the Korean War                                        

Friday                                  HS193422           

9:30-11:00                          

Nov 1, 8, 15

Instructor(s): Dr. John Lemza

The purpose of this course is to examine the United States’ involvement in the Korean War. Once called “the forgotten war” some historians now consider it to be a “neglected war.” Some consider it a civil war. As such, it deserves rethinking. It was a time of transformation for America driven by changing global dynamics that resonated in politics, diplomacy, the home front, the military, and in how the nation perceived itself. In that context, the war parted the curtain on an uncertain future that would introduce important changes over the ensuing decades as former allies became new enemies. It was in fact, one of the most important events of the early Cold War period. Examination of this conflict will also include the grassroots perspectives of combatants and civilians who participated in, and were affected by, the consequences of the war.

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The Fall of Richmond: April 2-3, 1865                                     

Friday                                  HS193382           

11:30-12:30                        

Nov 1

Instructor(s): Hank Holland

The fall of Richmond, the night of April 2, 1865, is known as the night they drove old Dixie down. The Confederate Government, Army and the citizens left behind in Richmond on that fateful night will be the topic of this course. Students will enjoy a lecture, brochures and a video presentation.

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Pleasant View African-American School A                                           

Wednesday                                      HS193427           

12:30-1:30                          

Nov 6

Instructor(s): Bryan Truzzie

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. Pleasant View School is an early twentieth century African American one-room schoolhouse. This course will cover the history of Pleasant View as one of the last preserved African American schoolhouses in Chesterfield County. Students will examine the use of the building, its architecture, its similarity to early Rosenwald schools and its place in history as an early educational facility.

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Global Cultural Geography: British America                                        

Thursday                                            HS193087           

9:30-11:00                          

Nov 7, 14

Instructor(s): William Seay

This course will provide an historical and cultural geographical journey through British America from colony to colony: Virginia to New England, Pennsylvania, the Carolinas and Georgia. Students will discover various ethnic groups that contributed to a new "American" identity.

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Tinbridge Hill (Parts 1 and 2)                                     

Tuesday                                              HS193412           

9:30-11:00                          

Nov 12, 19

Instructor(s): DuBois Miller

This course will be based on the instructor's two autobiographies: Ten on Tin and Three More on Tin. He will share why and how he wrote the books which describe his early life on Tinbridge Hill, the first and most impoverished African-American neighborhood in Lynchburg, Virginia. The period from 1950-1963 will be covered which is when the city transitioned from segregation to integration.

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Chesterfield in World War I Centennial B                                             

Wednesday                                      HS193426           

12:30-1:30                          

Nov 20

Instructor(s): Bryan Truzzie

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. This course will address the history surrounding the historic 1917 Chesterfield Courthouse and present some of the significance regarding the 2017 Centennial festivities.

                                ______________________________

Spy Pilot: Francis Gary Powers, the U-2 Incident, and a Controversial Cold War Legacy                                  

Thursday                                            HS193401            *$25

9:30-11:00                          

Dec 5

Instructor(s): Francis Gary Powers, Jr.

For over 25 years, Midlothian resident, Francis Gary Powers Jr., has conducted research on the Cold War and the misinformation about the U-2 Incident of May 1, 1960. In his new book, Spy Pilot, Gary separates fact from fiction and helps to set the record straight in regards to the conspiracy theories that surrounded his father and the U-2 Incident. Using recently declassified files, never before published written histories, and unpublished audio recordings by key individuals associated with the U-2 program, Gary uncovers the truth behind the U-2 Incident. During this course, Gary will talk about the Cold War; the Spielberg movie, “Bridge of Spies”; his book, “Letters from a Soviet Prison”; and the research that went into his most recent book. If you would like a copy of the new book, “Spy Pilot,” simply pay the optional course fee at time of registration, and you will receive your signed copy at the class!

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Defending Richmond 1861-1865                                               

Friday                                  HS193411           

9:30-10:30                          

Dec 6

Instructor(s): Hank Holland

This course will present students with a slide show and lecture on the outer defenses of Richmond during the American Civil War.

                                ______________________________

1917 Chesterfield Courthouse Centennial B                                       

Tuesday                                              HS193424           

9:30-10:30                          

Dec 10

Instructor(s): Bryan Truzzie

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. This course will address the history surrounding the historic 1917 Chesterfield Courthouse and present some of the significance regarding the 2017 Centennial festivities.

                                ______________________________

Pre-Columbian History                                

Tuesday                                              HS193331           

11:00-12:30                        

Dec 10, 17

Instructor(s): Kenneth D. Alford

Hundreds of years before the Europeans invaded the Americas, three large city/states had flourished and disappeared. These city/states, Chaco Canyon (New Mexico), Teotihuacan and Chichen Itza (Mexico), will be examined in depth. This course will begin in the year 1000 B.C., when the Olmecs created the first proper civilization in Mesoamerica along the Gulf of Mexico. It was the Olmecs that carved the large stone head and organized many ceremonial centers. Their decline resulted in the rise and influencing of the Mayan civilization, followed a thousand years later by the rise of the Zapotec and creation of the city of Mont Alban near Oaxaca. This course will explore the varying cultures collectively called Mound Builders where these prehistoric inhabitants lived principally along the Mississippi River valley in North America. During a 5,000-year period, they constructed various styles of earthen mounds for religious and ceremonial burial and elite living areas. In the American southwest between 850 and 1250 A.D., the Anasazi built Chaco Canyon as a major center of culture for thousands of inhabits. This course will present in detail several astronomical events, the Mayan written language and their remarkable numerical counting system. The instructor has firsthand knowledge on this subject, as he has traveled and studied in all the locations listed.

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The Normandy Invasion: Day of Days                                    

Wednesday                                      HS193432           

1:30-3:30                             

Dec 11

Instructor(s): Christopher L. Kolakowski

The Invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944 was the greatest amphibious operation in history. It also started a battle that marked the beginning of Nazi Germany's end. This course will tell the story of Normandy, from D-Day through the liberation of Paris.

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Pleasant View African-American School B                                           

Tuesday                                              HS193428           

9:30-10:30                          

Dec 17

Instructor(s): Bryan Truzzie

Please register for only one session (A or B) to allow all students a chance to participate. Pleasant View School is an early twentieth century African American one-room schoolhouse. This course will cover the history of Pleasant View as one of the last preserved African American schoolhouses in Chesterfield County. Students will examine the use of the building, its architecture, its similarity to early Rosenwald schools and its place in history as an early educational facility.

                                ______________________________

Babyboomer Christmas Memories                                         

Thursday                                            HS193433           

10:00-11:00                        

Dec 19

Instructor(s): Deborah Alsko

Storyteller Deborah Alsko will share heartwarming memories of what Christmas was like back in the 1960's.

                                ______________________________

About Fees
Your Lifelong Learning Institute membership gives you access to all of LLI classes and trips, most without any additional costs. There are some classes and trips which require additional fees. Where there are additional fees, those fees must be paid at the time of registration. Fees can be paid by check, cash or credit card. If paying by check, please clearly indicate the classes and trips being covered.